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Student Achievement Data
 
The data below summarize the educational outcomes for recent program cohorts. These data compare the original enrollment for the listed cohorts with each cohort's graduation, withdrawal, failure, and licensure rates.  While individual times to program completion vary greatly, and historically have ranged anywhere from three to ten years, the expected time to completion for the program, including coursework, internship, and dissertation, is seven years, while the maximum time allowed is twelve years.  Cohorts which have reached the seventh year expectation of completion are shaded in gray.  As students do not usually take preliminary exams before late in their second or early in their third years, nor go on internship until their third or fourth, no data is yet available for later cohorts.  While we obviously know how many students enter and how many graduate, licensure rates for graduates are by definition estimates. Graduates often, but not always, let us know if they have earned the LMFT; we also search licensure board verification databases to check on graduates' status.  But it remains possible that more graduates are licensed than we know.  In addition, graduates who live or work in other countries without similar clinical credentialing often can not seek equivalent licensure.  And those who go exclusively into research or other non-clinical positions may not seek licensure as well.  Finally, while infrequently students who try may fail to make satisfactory progress, students also occasionally withdraw voluntarily for any number of reasons: interest in a different area of study, deciding they do not need a PhD, changes in life circumstances that interfere with study, such as marriages, pregnancies, or voluntary relocations.  Thus it is important to be cautious regarding inferences to be drawn from this data.  Overall, over 85% of all students since the program began in the late 1970s have graduated, the vast majority of graduates have been licensed, and on average they have graduated in about four and a half years.

100% of graduates seeking jobs for all listed cohorts are employed.



Cohort Year


Entering Number


Passed Prelims

% Passed Prelims


Finished Internship

% Finished Internship



Graduated


% Graduated



ABD


% ABD
Voluntarily Withdrew, Personal Choice
% Voluntarily Withdrew
Failed to Make Satisfactory Progress % Failed to Make Satisfactory Progress Grads Taking Licensing Exam** % Grads Taking Licensing Exam** Grads Passing Licensing Exam** % Passing Who Took Exam**

Grads Licensed**


% Grads Licensed**

Non-Grads Licensed
2002 5 5 100 5 100 5 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 100 5 100 5 100  
2003 6 6 100 6 100 6 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 66 4 100 4 66  
2004 5 5 100 5 100 5 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 100 5 100 5 100  
2005 6 6 100 6 100 4 66 2 33 0 0 0 0 4 100 4 100 4 66 2
2006 6 5 83 5 83 3 50 2 33 1 17 0 0 3 100 3 100 3 100 2
2007* 6 5 83 4 66 2 33* 1 17 3* 50 0 0 1 50 1 100 1 50  
2008 5 5 100 5 100 3 60 1 20 1 20 0 0 3 100 3 100 3 100 1
2009 6 5 83 5 83 4 66 1 17 1 17 0 0 1 33 2 100 2 50 1
2010 6 6 100 6 100 5 83 1 17 0 0 0 0 4 66 4 100 4 66 1
2011 6 6 100 6 100 1 17 5 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 n/a n/a 0 0 3
2012 4 2 50 1 25                              
2013 6 6 100                                  
2014 6                 1 17                  
2015 6                 1 17                  
2016                                        
2017                                        
2018                                        
* This cohort experienced a highly unusual confluence of personal and health issues unrelated to the program or their academic progress.  The members of this cohort unaffected by such concerns have graduated.
** These statistics obviously omit international graduates who return to countries where licensure usually does not exist.